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        • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Marko Drajić
          • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy

          • Hungary is currently Serbia’s closest international partner. Bilateral relations between the two countries are no longer marred by any disputes and their political and economic interests increasingly coincide. The values underpinning the administrations of both countries have converged to ...

        • The Security Sector in a Captured State
          • Publications

          • Autor:
          • The Security Sector in a Captured State

          • Report on state capture in Serbia is BCSP genuine and pioneering work aiming to document and deconstruct ongoing process of state capture in the security sector through presentation of mechanisms, actors and consequences of this process.

        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        • Pandemic of geopolitics
          • Publications

          • Autor: Igor Bandovic
          • Pandemic of geopolitics

          • How does the COVIDー19 pandemic influence Serbia's foreign policy - read in the op-ed writen by BCSP Director Igor Bandovic for the weekly "Vreme".

        Serbia and Hungary: Hammering DemocracyThe Security Sector in a Captured StateThe Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early FindingsPandemic of geopolitics
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          • Year: 2011
          • How to build the integrity of the independent institutions that fight corruption in Serbia?

          • 15. october 2011. Report prepared by Marko Milosevic, Researcher, BCSP

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          The organization Transparency Serbia (TS) and the Open Society Foundation (OSF), hosted in Belgrade's Sava Centre on September 13, 2011 a conference dedicated to prospects for effective fight against corruption in Serbia. They were joined by representatives of the Government, judiciary and the National Assembly, the Delegation of the European Union (EU) in Serbia, independent state institutions (ISI) and representatives of civil society. 

           

          In the opening address, Professor Vladimir Goati (TS) presented the results of this organization's 15-month long study on the state of corruption in Serbia. Interior Minister Ivica Dacic conveyed to the public how from January to August 2011, 2,696 acts with elements of corruption were found, while in the course of last year, 3858 such acts were discovered. The Minister determined that 40% more acts of corruption were discovered last year, then in the period from 2000 to 2005. Still, when Dacic was asked has the Republic's Prosecutor Office prosecuted these cases, he provided no response. 

           

          EU Ambassador to Serbia Vincent Degert has pointed out that the laws adopted are of good quality, still adding how the focus now is going to be on their consistent implementation. The situation is not ideal in the EU either, according to a survey by Transparency International: 19 countries in the EU fight against corruption were rated above average grade (over 5), while as many as 8 countries anti-corruption measures failed to bring a high score. Degert believes that Serbia's score since 2000 was improved from 1,3 to 3,5, however, there is much that still needs to be done. 

           

          Participants in the first panel, Ivica Dacic, Vincent Degert, Vladimir Goati, Jadranka Jelincic from the OSF and Srdjan Majstorovic from the Serbia's European Integration Office (SEIO) were unanimous in their assessment that it is the application of existing laws what Serbia lacks in a successful fight against corruption. 

           

          The panel which was attended by representatives of legislative and executive branch of government did not offer anything new, except that once again newly adopted laws were listed as some kind of encouragement to anti corruption efforts. Numerous indictments and prosecutions of corruption cases are left unanswered. Also, one of the arguments in the debate about the slow pace of court proceedings was the fact that prison facilities in Serbia are too small. Yet, the Department of Justice provided assurances that overcrowding does not affect the prolongation of the judicial process. This issue is obviously going to remain unanswered. 

           

          The last panel was dedicated to the work of independent state institutions. Commissioner for Information of Public Importance and Personal Data Protection Rodoljub Sabic, the president of the State Audit Institution (SAI) Radoslav Sretenović, Ombudsman Saša Janković, Director of the Anti-Corruption Agency Zorica Marković and Secretary of the Republic Electoral Commission Veljko Odalović talked about limited capacities of the institutions they represented. All of them share a common problem: lack of human and material resources which are otherwise - through systematization of positions of responsibility in public administration and budget allocations - guaranteed. In 2011, budget revision affected more than the rest of the public administration: the Agency, the Commissioner and SAI funds were trimmed down between 14 and 30%. Representatives of these institutions see these reduces of budget as a form of pressure by the Government on their work.

        • Tags: corruption, anti-corruption policy, independent bodies, Serbia
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