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        • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Marko Drajić
          • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy

          • Hungary is currently Serbia’s closest international partner. Bilateral relations between the two countries are no longer marred by any disputes and their political and economic interests increasingly coincide. The values underpinning the administrations of both countries have converged to ...

        • The Security Sector in a Captured State
          • Publications

          • Autor:
          • The Security Sector in a Captured State

          • Report on state capture in Serbia is BCSP genuine and pioneering work aiming to document and deconstruct ongoing process of state capture in the security sector through presentation of mechanisms, actors and consequences of this process.

        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Maja Bjelos, Marko Drajić
          • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic

          • Masks have slipped and the interests of Serbia’s foreign policy were exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. These interests are not based on the principles of common goods, but on mechanism for preserving the existing internal order. This is one of the conclusions in the foreign policy analysis ...

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        Serbia and Hungary: Hammering DemocracyThe Security Sector in a Captured StateThe Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyThe Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical PandemicCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
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          • Year: 2004
          • How to Solve the Problem of Redundant Military Personnel

          • 13. june 2004. Colonel Slobodan Tadić, Deputy Head of the SMAF General Staff Personnel Department

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          The reform of the defence system, started after the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro had been constituted, will cause significant changes in personnel structure of all system elements, which will be mostly felt in the Army. As a necessity, there is an urging need of reduction of the Army, due to a number of interconnected factors. At the moment, the extent of this reduction cannot be discussed since the basic starting elements for specifying the size of the Army has not been defined yet. Namely, the basic doctrinal documents - the Defence Strategy and the Military Doctrine, which gives basic for defining the organisation of the Army, and therefore the personnel structure adequate to such an organisation, have not been adopted yet. Furthermore, the fact which should be emphasised is that the Army now includes the institutions, for which it still not certain whether they will remain within the Army: border units, maintenance companies, newspaper and publishing institutions, experiment centres, museums, military schools, military medical institutions, the Army clubs, military libraries and many other institutions, make a significant percent of the Army members. Natural drain of personnel, for those persons who fulfil or will fulfil the conditions for retirement, must also be taken into consideration.

          However, even before adoption of doctrinal documents and solving the questions listed, it can be concluded that there will be the redundant personnel. This conclusion is based on the fact that the State Union decided to develop smaller, up-to-date equipped army, which also means changes in the personnel structure. Therefore, the redundant personnel will inevitably appear and therefore it will be necessary to develop a programme for solving this problem.

          There is the question of whether a special programme of taking care for redundant military personnel is needed. The necessity of such a programme, different from a programme of taking care for redundant workers in other structures, can be seen in the fact that fired military personnel would not lose only jobs, but also their profession. Namely, most of them were educated in military schools and their knowledge may not be adequately applied out of the Army so it is necessary, along with other measures of welfare care, to provide them training for the jobs out of the Army, in order to put them into the equal position with the other persons looking for employment.

           

          Experiences of other countries

          After Warsaw Pact was dissolved, all former members of the Treaty faced with the redundant military personnel. Therefore, during the last decade of the last century, almost all countries in transition started developing the programmes for these personnel. Analysing the experiences and results achieved by these countries in preparation and implementation of these programmes, huge variety can be noticed. A general conclusion is that the successfulness of a programme mostly depended on the level of support given by a state’s government. A number of countries had significant results in realisation of their programmes even to the point where they initiated industrial activities in certain fields - Russia, for example, where numerous military premises, given under favourable conditions to the dismissed military personnel, were used in developing entrepreneurship.

          The characteristic of the training program in Bulgaria was that numerous persons were dismissed in a very short period. Namely, within the first six years, (1996-2002) very few persons were dismissed so accelerated process started in 2002, with the intention to enter 2004 with the projected number. More than 8,000 persons were dismissed in a year (since March 1st 2002 until March 1st 2003), 5,600 persons were dismissed within the next three months and 1,300 persons more were dismissed until the end of the year. Under the conditions of transition, Bulgarian economy could not absorb such a huge labour force so only about 800, among the total of 15,000 persons dismissed within less than two years, found new jobs.

          Among the programmes, developed by Western countries, the British programme attracts great attention, characterised by a high level of government's support, comprehensiveness and experience lasting for decades. The government's support is not only declamatory but the real one, including financial support, constant supervision of realisation and developed mechanisms for giving priority to the dismissed military personnel in getting jobs. There is a regulation according to which a member of the army must be informed about dismissal at least two years ahead. British programme has a long tradition (since 1922); it has been developed and perfected for decades so brought to a high level of efficiency. Supported by the developed institutions, more than 95% of dismissed soldiers find an adequate job within six months after dismissal. The level of the development of British industry should also be taken into consideration.

          Naturally, the experiences presented should be taken into consideration when the programme in our country is developed but it would be wrong to copy any of them.

           

          Programme in Serbia and Montenegro

          Persons dismissed from the Army should be helped with social adaptation and economic integration into the civil society. This must be emphasised as an extremely complex activity because these persons lose not only jobs but their profession also. Along with solving the problem of their employment, the programme is to provide conditions for solving a number of other social problems.

          As a particular issue, this programme is to extend the knowledge about capabilities developed by military personnel during their education in military schools, as well as during their service in the Army, preferred by each employer, in any structure: discipline, responsibility, determination, reliability, adaptability, resourcefulness, organising capacities, readiness for team work, capability to motivate themselves and the others, experience in leading people and a number of other capacities and characteristics. 

          In order to secure thorough preparation and realisation of the programme, it is necessary:

          • to form a national team at the level of the State Union, which is to manage the creation and realisation of the programme and to coordinate the work of all participants,

          • to include all institutions of the State Union and its members in the preparation and realisation of the programme, down to the level of local self-management,

          • to form the structures which are to prepare the programme and carry it out,

          • to define the criteria for professional military service, according to the standards implemented in modern organisation of armed forces,

          • to prepare normative and legal basis for conducting the programme,

          • to examine the labour market in order to get reliable data on structure of personnel needed in different regions, which could be the basis for directing redundant personnel to certain - needed re-training for the jobs where chances for employment are realistic ones,

          • to examine the possibility for renting certain military premises, which are to be abandoned, to the dismissed persons who can organise their own business; this can be done after the Law on Property has been adopted,

          • to form the centres for re-training officers in order to educate them for civilian jobs, at the level of their education. This is necessary since such institutions have not been developed here so far,

          • to work out a comprehensive marketing support for the programme, in order to secure its successful realisation,

          • to initiate the activities of nongovernmental organisations,

          • to prepare financial construction for the programme,

          • to conduct polls among the Army members in order to collect reliable information on desired solutions.

          The questions listed are extremely complex and cannot be solved within a short period. However, one should keep in mind the fact that re-organisation of the Army will not be done "over night" but in a years-long period, which gives space for complete work out of the programme and finding optimal solutions for all the problems.

          Aware of the fact that this is a very delicate issue, that important, vital questions of the professional members of the Army are to be solved here, the maximum effort and knowledge must be used in order to prepare a programme suitable for the personnel involved. No programme can secure the complete realisation of all the wishes but it must provide maximum help in solving problems that will appear during this process.

           

          What has been done so far?

          The work on the programme started by the middle of 2003. Studying the experiences of other countries, it has been concluded that a comprehensive programme must be developed, which would be a continuous one and perform as a plan of human resources in the future.

          SCG Defence Ministry established cooperation with the British Ministry of Defence. A number of meetings with the experts were organised so far, a number of seminars and courses were held and British institutions dealing with supporting dismissed persons were visited.

          During the work on the project, the cooperation was established with ministries and other institutions in charge in Serbia, while the cooperation with the institutions in Montenegro is being established.

          Within preparation of new normative documents, the work has started aimed to define criteria for professional military service and cessation of the service, which will be the basic principles for defining redundant personnel.

          A special organisation unit was established to be exclusively involved in development of the project, as well as regional centres for re-training in Belgrade, Novi Sad, Niš and Podgorica. Regional centre for training in Belgrade is being formed.

          The initiative was started at the level of the State Union, for forming a special body (national committee or a similar organ) aimed for coordination of the participants in the programme.

          General opinion is that a comprehensive programme should be prepared and all the institutions for its realisation should be developed before dismissal of redundant personnel starts, which is to create conditions for organised approach in solving the problem of redundant personnel and the problems that will appear in the course of this. Activities organised so far give reasons to believe this question can be solved successfully and we have an opportunity to study what others were doing and not to repeat their mistakes.

        • Tags: military, reform, Serbia, soldier, human resurces, management, cadre
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