•  
        • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Marko Drajić
          • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy

          • Hungary is currently Serbia’s closest international partner. Bilateral relations between the two countries are no longer marred by any disputes and their political and economic interests increasingly coincide. The values underpinning the administrations of both countries have converged to ...

        • The Security Sector in a Captured State
          • Publications

          • Autor:
          • The Security Sector in a Captured State

          • Report on state capture in Serbia is BCSP genuine and pioneering work aiming to document and deconstruct ongoing process of state capture in the security sector through presentation of mechanisms, actors and consequences of this process.

        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        • Pandemic of geopolitics
          • Publications

          • Autor: Igor Bandovic
          • Pandemic of geopolitics

          • How does the COVIDー19 pandemic influence Serbia's foreign policy - read in the op-ed writen by BCSP Director Igor Bandovic for the weekly "Vreme".

        Serbia and Hungary: Hammering DemocracyThe Security Sector in a Captured StateThe Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early FindingsPandemic of geopolitics
    •  
    •  
    • Info BCSP

    • Sign up to receive our e-bulletin.
    •  
    •  
    • Find publications, analysis and documents in our unique resource base available to all visitors of BCSP web site.
      Advance search
    •  
    •  
    •  
     
    •  
        • Editor's note

          Killing in a war in Caesar’s time was rather inexpensive - just 75 cents per man. The price rose to around three thousand dollars "per enemy’s head" during the Napoleonic wars. In the American Civil War the amount was five thousand, while in the World War I the price amounted to as much as $21,000. By stating these facts on the eve of the World War II, the U.S. senator Homer Bone did not explain how he came up with this calculation. A politician does not find it important to show what methodological acrobatics can be used to express military costs of the ancient Rome in the U.S. currency. Politicians care more about attracting public attention and pointing to the consequences of certain security policy.
          The researchers of the Belgrade School for Security Studies have tried to achieve the same goal, duly respecting strict academic standards. This issue of the "Western Balkans Security Observer" brings several texts inspired by this very statement of Senator Bone, only that our researchers’ questions were not so morbid - we were not interested in the price of killing a man, but rather wanted to know how much money has to be invested in protection of people’ lives.
          The price of security is increasing but modern security threats are not getting weaker. This issue analyzes the consequences of only one particular threat - the proliferation of small arms and light weapons. In Serbia, where a wedding feast may end up with shooting down a plane by a weapon of that kind, the proliferation is not even mentioned in strategic documents as a security threat. A global failure of the struggle against this kind of proliferation is being discussed in the column "Challenges, Risks and Threats", in an article explaining that the consequences of the proliferation are not measured only in death toll. Too expensive, yet ever fragile security is not something that only the Western Balkans is troubled with, as the region now has to pay out its "war dividends". In an attempt to protect itself from the "Next Attack", the Anglo-Saxon world is trying to control even the last milliliter of liquid that a passenger may take on board the plane. Sometimes, however, even the fashion style of a passenger is subject to restrictions! As one can read in our column, "Security Catch", security officers at the New York airport forced a person to change his T-shirt so as not to upset other passengers. The inscription written on this T-shirt sounds like a deliberative democracy exclamation - "We will not be silent". Yet, it was written not only in English but in Arabic as well.
          By refusing to keep silent about the results of their latest analysis, Mearsheimer and Walt provoked strong reactions in the academic world. Their essay on the influence of the Israeli lobby on U.S. foreign policy was published on the eve of the latest conflicts in the Middle East. An article in our column "Atlantic Shores" explains how important this opening of a taboo is and what lesson Serbia can learn from this case. The need for a public debate is particularly pointed out in an article on the professionalization of the Army of Serbia in our long-standing column "Security Sector Reform".
          Unfortunately, this autumn Serbia did not see any public debate on the most important legal document of the country. However, the Belgrade School is offering to the public an insight into the Constitutional provisions dealing with the security sector. This issue of our journal also brings an overview of the National Security Strategy of Montenegro.
          The second article in the column "Atlantic Shores" estimates the chances of Serbia to join the Partnership for Peace Programme at the forthcoming NATO Summit in Riga. So, the researchers of the Belgrade School have dared not only to offer their analyses and "diagnoses", but also certain prognoses. There is an open invitation for all our colleagues dealing with security studies to join in these efforts in the following issues.  

        • Tags: professionalisation, Serbian Army, Armed Forces Reform, proliferation, light weapons, SALW, Security, democracy, public fincancies, constitution
    •  
    • Post a comment

    •  
    •  
    • See all comments

    •  
    •